Sealing an unfinished stock

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Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Die Judicii » 30 Oct 2018, 4:36 pm

Looking for a recommended treatment or product to seal a semi finished walnut stock.

I have the stock now, but what I am lacking is the time needed to finish it.
So, in the meantime I need to seal it.

? Tru Oil, or something different.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Gaznazdiak » 30 Oct 2018, 5:03 pm

I would give it a good wetting with Danish oil, let it sit until it gets tacky, then wipe it down with a lint free cloth dampened with Danish oil, then another with a dry cloth :drinks:
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Supaduke » 30 Oct 2018, 6:03 pm

If you want nice and shiny....Truoil, for the best finish sand to a fine finish, like 1200, then wet sand with some BLO, Danish oil , any decent quality wood oil. Will seal the pores and give a nice smooth shiny finish. Let the oil dry and rub down with a cloth. Apply Truoil one coat at a time, sparingly with a cloth. Light rub down with fine sand paper and wipe down between coats. Three coats is enough , 5-7 is better. Some say the best finish is obtained with the last 2 coats applied with the aerosol Truoil.

Or wet sand with oil, rub down, then oil with your preferred wood oil. They all work, they all do essentially the same thing.

Apply multiple coats one at a time and rub down between coats. Up to you how many coats. Can top off with various waxes, again all the reputable ones work. Buff to your desired level. More time and work yields best finish on a sliding scale from awesome to sh1t house
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by madang55 » 30 Oct 2018, 7:02 pm

I finished a stock myself, thought I was very brave. Used 0000 steel wool after very fine paper. I kept on adding coats until I got sick of doing it. probably 6 or 7 coats. The stock maker suggested Wipe on Poly. It gives a nice finish, but probably not as durable as the Danish or Tru.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Wm.Traynor » 30 Oct 2018, 7:13 pm

Got a tip from www.marlinowners.com/forum once upon a time
1/3 satin poly 1/3 boiled linseed 1/3 turps
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by yoshie » 30 Oct 2018, 7:17 pm

I've just done a stock with Bitchwood Casey True oil and stock wax. I'm really happy how it turned out. I sanded with about 5 different grades of sand paper and final with steel wool. About 6 coats of True oil sanding out blemishes with the steel wool between coats. Took a week, one good afternoon sanding then let each coat dry for 24 hours.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Die Judicii » 30 Oct 2018, 7:32 pm

Thanks fellas, but I think most of you missed the point.

The stock is only semi finished and still has sharp ridges around all the contours as well as blade and tool marks.

I only want to seal it and prevent any possible cracks etc until I can get around to doing the rest of the shaping, contouring and 1st sanding.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Gaznazdiak » 30 Oct 2018, 8:12 pm

Die Judicii wrote:Thanks fellas, but I think most of you missed the point.

The stock is only semi finished and still has sharp ridges around all the contours as well as blade and tool marks.

I only want to seal it and prevent any possible cracks etc until I can get around to doing the rest of the shaping, contouring and 1st sanding.


Yes mate, a wipe over then wipe off with Danish will seal it and harden it slightly.

You can do it over and over.
I used it on a walking staff I carved as a snake.

As I carved it by hand with small hand chisels, I could only do a bit at a time then sealed it. I worked on it for over 2 yrs, sealing, carving, sealing, carving.
Then, when I'd finally finished I brushed the Danish on one last time and let it set as a finish.

I made the tip of the tail from a bolt.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by bigfellascott » 30 Oct 2018, 8:34 pm

Beautiful job Mick, well done mate. :thumbsup:
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Thom318 » 30 Oct 2018, 8:45 pm

If it's just a temporary sealing job, I'd just use a spray on clear coat meant for craft, then sand it off when you get time to finish it off how you really want to
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by SCJ429 » 30 Oct 2018, 8:48 pm

Very well done, I wish I had a bit of talent to make something like that.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Gaznazdiak » 31 Oct 2018, 12:02 am

Thank you chaps, I'm pretty happy with it.
To put the tip on so it wasn't likely to fall off, I drilled out the hole so it was bigger inside than at the entrance and poured some molten lead in first, then with the tip heated by butane torch I pushed it into place. The excess was pushed out and when it cooled it was nice and solid.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by straightshooter » 31 Oct 2018, 6:44 am

Simplest answer is don't worry about it.
I have unfinished semi inletted stock blanks that have been lying around for 20+ years with no problems with dry checking or cracks or shrinkage except for one where termites made a start up through the butt.
Provided the stock was well seasoned prior to any shaping then there will be no problems.
If you are concerned then enclose in a heavy polythene bag. At least that will keep dust and bugs out.
If your stock was shaped and inletted before the stock was stabilised with adequate drying then nothing will help.
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by marksman » 31 Oct 2018, 6:51 pm

glad wrap can be used :thumbsup:
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Die Judicii » 31 Oct 2018, 7:25 pm

marksman wrote:glad wrap can be used :thumbsup:


The poor mans condom,,,,,,,,,,,, Glad Wrap and rubber bands.

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Die Judicii » 31 Oct 2018, 7:28 pm

Ahhhhh yes,, Thanks one and all for the input
I suspected these would be the answers,, but just wanted other opinions b4 I went ahead

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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Die Judicii » 31 Oct 2018, 7:30 pm

Gaz Mate, you are talented and have lots of patience.

Could I be so ignorant as to ask what species timber ?
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Re: Sealing an unfinished stock

Post by Gaznazdiak » 31 Oct 2018, 8:39 pm

Thanks DJ.

It's yellow box. I wanted a particular snake effect so I hunted down a green branch that would give me the general shape, when I found it I took a strip of bark off the bottom and left the branch on the tree for another month for the exposed wood to dry and brown, that gave me the belly colouring without the worry of trying to get an even stain on green wood.
When it was browned properly I cut the branch and stripped it. I put it away for 2 weeks to let the green surface dry a little.
Then using a Tiger Snake I've had in a bottle of metho since 1969 as a reference I carved the head and then drew the head scales, mouth etc in pencil and carved those.

I bought three 4lt tins of Danish, cut a length of 90mm pipe, capped one end so that I could stand the stick in the pipe then fill it with the Danish oil, cap the top and left it soaking in it for 2 weeks so the oil could really penetrate.
A rub down then a month to dry.

Then the finger killer, carving all those scales into wood that was hard as rock.

Using the small hand carving chisels I'd work until my fingertips got too sore, then give it a rub down/rub off with Danish and stash it in a cupboard for a few weeks then repeat.

Sounds like a lot of pissing about for a walking stick but I like making things.
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