rifle stock for heavy kickers

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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by bladeracer » 30 Dec 2018, 8:40 pm

TassieTiger wrote:Speaking of which - old railway timbers were cut from many different hardwiod timbers and then coated in cerakote to protect the wood. There would (pun) be enough thickness of the timber with ina sleeper for a stock ? As stoney has mentioned above - some old railway guys might be a source...


I think you mean creosote ;-)
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by SCJ429 » 30 Dec 2018, 9:54 pm

You can get walnut in different weights, I also added lead weight to the stock of my 416 Rigby which is the easiest to shoot big bore I have shot. Heavy stock with ballast and a heavy profile barrel makes it a dream.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by TassieTiger » 30 Dec 2018, 9:59 pm

bladeracer wrote:
TassieTiger wrote:Speaking of which - old railway timbers were cut from many different hardwiod timbers and then coated in cerakote to protect the wood. There would (pun) be enough thickness of the timber with ina sleeper for a stock ? As stoney has mentioned above - some old railway guys might be a source...


I think you mean creosote ;-)


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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Die Judicii » 31 Dec 2018, 3:50 pm

Stoney and Tassie,
I hear what your saying,, the creosote of latter years was impregnated under pressure, and I wonder how much would remain to upset the take up of stain etc.
Whereas, in very early years it was merely painted or at best, old fashioned soaked, in which case the termites still attack as they get older.
I have about 30 of em, and most have been eaten out by the little buggers.

Stoney, when you say "ironwood" do you mean iron bark ?
Or is "ironwood" another species that I haven't noticed ?

If you mean iron bark,,,,,, I have plenty of that on our property.
It is pretty dull and drab with no real life or color in the grain.

Although the hardness and weight would lend itself well.
There is some differences between the narrow leaf and the broad leaf varieties of it however.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by TassieTiger » 31 Dec 2018, 11:55 pm

I was in a specialty timber shop only a couple of days ago looking at a slab of Huon pine for a table...
They had some beautiful hardwoods in there...some Blackwood heart would make a beautiful stock, with insane character dark and rich knot/growth lines within, but would mark way to easy and might be ultimately too soft ...some wild cherry or jarrah might be nice as well and prob a bit harder.
I think even if you found the timber you wanted, you’d have to make sure it had been seasoned correctly to withstand the forces at play...I’d take a properly seasoned medium wood over a poorly seasoned hard wood - a lot of work could go down the drain.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Ziad » 01 Jan 2019, 11:31 am

Railway sleepers have a ton of sand in them. As trains dump sand to get friction to breakb on metal tracks. Blunts blades very quickly. No idea if its good for riflestocks.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by pomemax » 01 Jan 2019, 12:29 pm

Acacia cambagei, commonly known as gidgee, stinking wattle or stinking gidgee,
Give this mob a ring weird and exotic timber shop in Mulgrave
http://www.trendtimbers.com.au/complete-timber-list.php
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... yGvkoEwRE/
wiki page may give you some other options https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acacia_cambagei
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Daddybang » 01 Jan 2019, 2:04 pm

Die Judicii wrote:
Stoney, when you say "ironwood" do you mean iron bark ?
Or is "ironwood" another species that I haven't noticed ?



Up this way we have the cooktown iron wood..used extensively in old station homesteads fence posts etc. Has to be shaped when still fairly green as it'll kill chainsaws when completely dried. Its completely termite resistant due to its dense structure and high levels of (I think) arsenic or some similar naturally occurring poison. ...don't burn in ya campfire!!!!
Old homesteads built over a hundred years ago made from this tree are still standing all over the cape!! :D :drinks:
Another species to consider thats readily available in qld is Blackbean (Moreton Bay Chestnut) :thumbsup: :drinks:
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Stoney » 01 Jan 2019, 6:07 pm

Stoney, when you say "ironwood" do you mean iron bark ?
Or is "ironwood" another species that I haven't noticed ?


No mate, ironwood.


Daddybang wrote:
Die Judicii wrote:
Stoney, when you say "ironwood" do you mean iron bark ?
Or is "ironwood" another species that I haven't noticed ?



Up this way we have the cooktown iron wood..used extensively in old station homesteads fence posts etc. Has to be shaped when still fairly green as it'll kill chainsaws when completely dried. Its completely termite resistant due to its dense structure and high levels of (I think) arsenic or some similar naturally occurring poison. ...don't burn in ya campfire!!!!
Old homesteads built over a hundred years ago made from this tree are still standing all over the cape!! :D :drinks:
Another species to consider thats readily available in qld is Blackbean (Moreton Bay Chestnut) :thumbsup: :drinks:


You know the stuff Daddybang :thumbsup:
It is Australia's answer to ebony in a way. When struck with an axe or chainsaw it sparks and leaves no noticeable scar. It doesn't really have a nice stock grain that I have noticed but if made into a stock it would be heavy and dent resistant :thumbsup: If you could get someone to cut it into a stock :lol:
I have used Blackbean before as well, it is really nice.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Die Judicii » 01 Jan 2019, 6:54 pm

pomemax wrote:Acacia cambagei, commonly known as gidgee, stinking wattle or stinking gidgee,
Give this mob a ring weird and exotic timber shop in Mulgrave
http://www.trendtimbers.com.au/complete-timber-list.php
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... yGvkoEwRE/
wiki page may give you some other options https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acacia_cambagei


thanks mate, i may be in melb in the very near future, and hopefully lookem up.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by pomemax » 01 Jan 2019, 6:56 pm

Die Judicii wrote:
pomemax wrote:Acacia cambagei, commonly known as gidgee, stinking wattle or stinking gidgee,
Give this mob a ring weird and exotic timber shop in Mulgrave
http://www.trendtimbers.com.au/complete-timber-list.php
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... yGvkoEwRE/
wiki page may give you some other options https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acacia_cambagei


thanks mate, i may be in melb in the very near future, and hopefully lookem up.

better do it on line they are in NSW
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Die Judicii » 01 Jan 2019, 6:58 pm

Thanks Stoney and DB, and others, much appreciated.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Daddybang » 02 Jan 2019, 8:24 am

You know the stuff Daddybang :thumbsup:
It is Australia's answer to ebony in a way. When struck with an axe or chainsaw it sparks and leaves no noticeable scar. It doesn't really have a nice stock grain that I have noticed but if made into a stock it would be heavy and dent resistant :thumbsup: If you could get someone to cut it into a stock :lol:
I have used Blackbean before as well, it is really nice.[/quote]

Yep stoney it's slightly harder than African blackwood which in turn is slightly harder than ebony and that probably explains why I've only seen it used for structures or stumps for watertanks etc. Shaping a piece for a stock would be "interesting" :lol: :thumbsup: :drinks:
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Stoney » 02 Jan 2019, 10:35 am

Yep stoney it's slightly harder than African blackwood which in turn is slightly harder than ebony.

Well I didn't know that. You learn something new every day. :D
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by trekin » 03 Jan 2019, 6:23 am

An opion for your gidgee would be to laminate pieces as a "skin" on the outside of another type of timber.
Blue gum salvaged from 1890's miners cottage;
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Not quarter sawn, so didn't have much in the way of grain, but did have some nice fiddleback (a bit hard to see in photos of stock)
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Rod_outbak » 03 Jan 2019, 10:08 am

[quote="Die Judicii"]Rod,,,,,,
Thanks for the extra info Mate.
That Purple Waddy sounds absolutely fascinating.
I'm guessing that it too is a very slow grower. (I will Dr Google it)

What would be the chances of getting some seeds Mate ?

I love growing trees from seed, and used to grow hundreds of many differing eucalypts and acacias.
[/quote]


Mate, we are 'enjoying' the start of our 8th year of drought, so dont hold your breath on Gidyea seeds...

However, I'll keep an eye out to see if any trees start seeding. I know the wild passionfruits have seeded, as have a few of the othe rnatives, so maybe the Gidyea as well..
Pretty sure the Red-Wing Lorikeets eat the seeds like crazy, so I'll keep an eye on them.

There is also a type of Gidyea down towards Boulia called 'Poison Gidyea', which has large quantities of Sodium Fluroacetate in the leaves.
Thats the main ingredient of 1080 poison.
During drought conditions, people in that area have to fence those trees off, as the cattle will die from eating the leaves.
When I was still working for DPIQ (~1999), I remember the Stock Inspector from Winton, being called down to inspect a mass death of cattle who'd broken into a fenced-off area of Poison Gidyea...

Waddy Wood sounds to be highly restricted, so likely nigh impossible to find.

I'll keep in mind the need to find some of the local Gidyea seeds...

There is another tree we seem to have a very small number of; a Bootlace Oak (Hakea Lorea). NO idea what the wood is like, but it's another unsual tree (for this area - likely common as muck elsewhere..).

Cheers,

Rod.
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Re: rifle stock for heavy kickers

Post by Rod_outbak » 15 Jan 2019, 1:17 pm

Die Judicii,

Attached is another possible option for your stock; called Boree.

Cousin of the Gidyea(another Acacia), but slightly easier to work. We used to often use Boree through the 'Donkey' Hot Water System, as it burns slightly cooler than Gidyea, but easier to chop fallen trees up. Boree tend to grow into bigger trees than gidyea in the same soil, but often out-grow their roots, and get toppled in big storms(or split in half). It's quite a heavy,dense wood, though. Still not quite as hard as Gidyea, but still harder than most woods I've seen stocks made from!

Not sure what it's like for splitting; I expect if you kept the stock well-oiled, I dont think it'd be a huge problem. This vase was bought as-is some 20 years back, from a bloke at Blackall, who was making them from old fence posts. I simply cleaned it and oiled it, and I'm not seeing a lot of signs that it's split badly in the mean-time.

Food for thought, at any rate. The heart-wood has a nice dark grain in it.

Cheers,

Rod.
Cheers,

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Boree Fencepost turned into vase.
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