Snake Report

Varminting and vertebrate pest control. Small game, hunting feral goats, foxes, dogs, cats, rabbits etc.

Re: Snake Report

Post by grandadbushy » 16 Nov 2018, 10:07 pm

Yeah Gaznazdiak there are a couple of species of frill neck lizard and sometimes that one gets mistaken for the bearded dragon or lizard
it hasn't got the profound frill like most other frillies it also has a rougher skin it mostly lives in the hard dry country
lovely animal and can be made friendly very easily to the point they will come into the house if it's at ground level
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Gaznazdiak » 16 Nov 2018, 10:16 pm

Sweet Jebus,.
I have Shinglebacks and feral cats raiding my dog's leftovers, I don't need any more

Although it would be cool to have another lizard visit.

The feral cat came around once too often and now"sleeps with the fishes" as the Mafioso say.

Good thing too, a heavily pregnant female feral is the last thing I needed.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by TassieTiger » 17 Nov 2018, 1:10 am

There is a fantastic video somewhere of a couple of tourists photoing a placid frill neck lizard - when it up and charges them...they absolutely s**t and the 2 guys and 2 girls (USA-from memory) just leg it, are falling over and screaming, they were cutting their legs up from falling and...on it goes. One of the funniest things I’ve seen.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 21 Nov 2018, 7:29 am

Gaznadiak,

Looks to be a Centralian Bearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps).
People call them frilled-neck lizards, but they arent the same family.
There are 4 or possibly 5 different Bearded Dragons across Australia, and the Centralian is the most common once you get away from the Eastern sea-board.

They are extremely aggro when digging their holes; goannas & foxes like to dig the eggs up and eat them.
Apparently; motherhood turns you psycho...

Attached pic is one I met; doing the same thing in 2005. She tried to attack my car as I was driving back from the cattle yards. When I swerved and ground to a stop, I went back to inspect her. She raced over and bit my boot! I liked how she then stood back to watch me fall over dead, and looked rather annoyed when I didnt. She then spent the enxt 5 minutes; spitting out the fresh cow-poop that was on my boot...

If you look at this pic, you can see the residual muscles in the throat, from when dragons still had fangs. They still have the muscles and part of the gear in the throat to give something a right good fanging, but no longer any fangs or venom glands.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Gaznazdiak » 21 Nov 2018, 8:50 am

Thanks for that ID Rod, I'm happy to report that my playing around with her tail gave her the sh!ts enough for her to change her building plans.

I could envision the nest full of eggs being pulverized by the next rigid and dog load of feed barley, due in a week or so.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Flyer » 22 Nov 2018, 4:47 am

Aussie snakes are good and all, but the scariest farking snake I ever had at my house when I was living in Asia was this 5m King Cobra. The farking thing reared up at me, and I shat myself! But I stood my ground, didn't make any sudden movements, and it just went back about its business. It's one of the few snakes that will not be frightened off by humans. This one made a hiss like a dog growling. The lesson I learned was not to chase after King Cobras to get a photo. But I didn't think anyone would believe me otherwise.

King Cobras almost exclusively east other snakes, so they're handy to have a around. Except they're more farking dangerous than anything they eat, LOL!

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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 22 Nov 2018, 6:04 am

I've read that it's a common thing for Cobras to crawl into bed with sleeping children to keep warm, and subsequently bite the child when it rolls on them.
I've heard that India also has a lot of stories of children bitten in this way.
[The story of Rikki-Tikki-Tarvi(Rudyard Kipling) was about a mongoose fighting cobras, who were trying to kill a British family; living in India]

We've had biiiiig King Browns looking for an entrance into the house, and completely ignoring us standing right in front of them. My mother has stood on one out on the coldroom landing who was doing that, and luckily, it didnt get the chance to bite her before she bolted.
Any of these lads get face-time with the Shovel of Destiny(tm), or a quick induction on the benefits of shotshells in the .45 auto...
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Re: Snake Report

Post by JimTom » 22 Nov 2018, 6:21 am

Snakes are all well and good in the scrub, and as a general rule, I leave them go about their business, however I am not a fan of them trying to get inside the house.
Your poor old mum must have nearly had a bloody heart attack Rod. I think standing on a big old Mulga would scare even the hardest toughest blokes.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 22 Nov 2018, 7:59 am

I only nail the bitey ones(Usually King Browns or Speckled Browns) when they are around the house yard, or trying to break in.
We dont nail any of the non-biteys, even though they can often give you a goodly heart attack when you meet them in the night...

I always admire the ones that pretend to be big & bitey, but are in fact small and toothless.
I feel obligated to respect their dedication to the sham...
[Might explain why I always enjoy conversing with Nigerian scammers...]

Mum said the Mulga snake felt 'squishy' under her shoe, and she didnt hang around long enough to let it get bitey...

I keep a trenching shovel (with the blade sharpened to an edge) beside the kitchen door, and have named it the 'Shovel of Destiny'...
Best thing ever for lopping the head off a Mulga snake...
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Re: Snake Report

Post by JimTom » 22 Nov 2018, 8:41 am

Rod_outbak wrote:I only nail the bitey ones(Usually King Browns or Speckled Browns) when they are around the house yard, or trying to break in.
We dont nail any of the non-biteys, even though they can often give you a goodly heart attack when you meet them in the night...

I always admire the ones that pretend to be big & bitey, but are in fact small and toothless.
I feel obligated to respect their dedication to the sham...
[Might explain why I always enjoy conversing with Nigerian scammers...]

Mum said the Mulga snake felt 'squishy' under her shoe, and she didnt hang around long enough to let it get bitey...

I keep a trenching shovel (with the blade sharpened to an edge) beside the kitchen door, and have named it the 'Shovel of Destiny'...
Best thing ever for lopping the head off a Mulga snake...


Yep fair enough mate. Can’t say I’d blame you for that.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Flyer » 22 Nov 2018, 5:54 pm

Rod_outbak wrote:I've read that it's a common thing for Cobras to crawl into bed with sleeping children to keep warm, and subsequently bite the child when it rolls on them.
I've heard that India also has a lot of stories of children bitten in this way.
[The story of Rikki-Tikki-Tarvi(Rudyard Kipling) was about a mongoose fighting cobras, who were trying to kill a British family; living in India]

We've had biiiiig King Browns looking for an entrance into the house, and completely ignoring us standing right in front of them. My mother has stood on one out on the coldroom landing who was doing that, and luckily, it didnt get the chance to bite her before she bolted.
Any of these lads get face-time with the Shovel of Destiny(tm), or a quick induction on the benefits of shotshells in the .45 auto...

Common cobras are probably not the most feared snakes in Asia, mainly due to the fact they are quite slow and will generally let you know when they are around by raising themselves off the ground and splaying their hood to make themselves visible. I've come across baby cobras that are quite amusing when they try to act all big and tough like the big snakes. They're slow because they usually strike from the defensive upright position, and don't have the same energy as a coiled striker.

King Cobras are not strictly members of the cobra family, but they just don't give a f***. The first one I saw was when I was reading a book in my front yard and saw a little snake tearing out of the bush across the lawn . . . quickly followed by a much bigger snake chasing it. I went after them and got pretty close to the King Cobra which didn't even acknowledge me as it searched for the other snake. They're not a bad-tempered snake, but they have no fear of anything, which means they won't get out of your way or try to escape when confronted.

My closest encounter was with a banded krait. Walking through the back jungle of my village one night, I flicked something up with my thong and looked down with a torch to see a banded krait had slithered over my foot and I'd kicked it up as I walked. They are very venomous and look like a baby King Cobra. They have a very high mortality rate and are responsible for a lot of deaths.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 22 Nov 2018, 6:27 pm

Well, there you go! Didnt know the King Cobra isnt a Cobra!
[Kinda like the King Brown isnt really a Brown snake...]

Pretty sure the little fishing boat the Special Forces harrassed the Japanese with around Singapore (Attack force Z??) in WW2 was named 'The Krait'.
Probably the fact that it was small yet deadly might have been reason for the name...
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Re: Snake Report

Post by winton » 23 Nov 2018, 11:47 am

Rod_outbak wrote:I keep a trenching shovel (with the blade sharpened to an edge) beside the kitchen door, and have named it the 'Shovel of Destiny'...
Best thing ever for lopping the head off a Mulga snake...


A pity we can't keep a 410 beside the kitchen door.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 23 Nov 2018, 12:24 pm

I keep a mag of CCI shotshells for the .45 auto; works about the same as a .410 AND is semi-auto!.

A lot of the time, it's simpler to give Fangboy a light Choppy-Choppy with the Shovel of Destiny...
Plan B is usually the .45 shotshells.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by winton » 23 Nov 2018, 1:31 pm

Trenching tool doesn't have that much reach. Are you throwing the thing?

When does Plan B come into effect? When they get a bit too big?
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 23 Nov 2018, 4:56 pm

Most of the time, a King Brown is arrogant enough to let you get close enough to be within reach of the shovel.

A trenching shovel can pin something to the ground ~2 metres from you, and the snake doesnt seem to get worried about it getting close.
Position it above his neck, a quick prayer to GOD you dont slip, and pin the barstard down firmly.
If the ground is reasonably hard, you can then (amongst all the trashing around) keep pushing until you sever his neck.
Strongly stress here that you dont commit till you've got him lined up well, and it's a narrow, sharp blade on the shovel.
[Note to self; NEVER TRY THIS at 11pm on your own, while using a square-ended spade with a dodgey wooden handle...had to choke him to death, and they take a looooong time!]
Also note that the sound of a King Brown trying to fang your shovel blade while he chokes to death, is a freaking eerie sound!! Sort of like fingernails on a chalkboard, but with more menace in it...

Plan B gets used when there isnt any risk of perforating the buildings/polypipes/tanks/etc, and/or if Mr FangBoy is quite lively. Speckled Browns are usually too flighty to get close enough to with the shovel, whereas King Browns cannot believe you'd ever consider hassling them...
GREAT thing about Plan B, is you keep pulling the trigger until you are certain FangBoy is toast... Also works a treat close-up on cats, rabbits, cane toads, and other small ferals...
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Rod_outbak » 23 Nov 2018, 4:59 pm

I should explain; Shovel of Destiny is one of those 100mm-wide long trenching shovels, with a roughly 2-metre handle on them.
NOT a trenching tool; as per the army have...
Found in the hardware store, and then sharpen the blade to a good edge with an angle grinder.
It gives you a very long-handled 100mm-wide knife to lop bitey things with.
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Re: Snake Report

Post by Daddybang » 23 Nov 2018, 5:30 pm

Rod_outbak wrote:I should explain; Shovel of Destiny is one of those 100mm-wide long trenching shovels, with a roughly 2-metre handle on them.
NOT a trenching tool; as per the army have...
Found in the hardware store, and then sharpen the blade to a good edge with an angle grinder.
It gives you a very long-handled 100mm-wide knife to lop bitey things with.



:lol: :lol: :lol:
I was trying to picture ya getting up close and personal with joe using one of the army trench tools and could only picture it ending badly!!! :lol: :drinks:
This hard living ain't as easy as it used to be!!!
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