Inherited Target rifles

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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by perentie » 31 Aug 2023, 7:58 am

When one inherits firearms as a beneficiary of a Will, are the firearms just transferred to ones Licence or does one have to get a PTA and pay a brokers fee for each one?
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 31 Aug 2023, 8:24 am

you still have to get the permit, and then do the transfer via a licensed dealer.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 31 Aug 2023, 8:53 am

ClaytonT88 wrote:Yeah, from how they're labelled, they're around .6-.8 grains of powder short of what the guys are running at the moment for the same barrel length/projectile, so I'll be looking to load some more soon and see how they go, also keen to see if maybe these were loaded for the nielsen I'm still waiting on as they've got a fair jump (.200") to the lands according to the measuring gear on this rifle.

If I get the nielsen and they're still not much chop, I might get an...unloader? and see if I can save the primers/projectiles and get some new brass, there's still over 250 loaded rounds and probably that again in fired rounds so plenty to get started with as I get into the sport.

At the moment I'm just getting used to firing the .308, she's got a fair kick and I've got a bruised collarbone so I might be looking at a limbsaver or maybe a jacket with some padding.


A kinnetic puller is a must in your kit. In your situation, you could get a Lee collet die, and also grab an extra mandrel for it from Fleabay or similar. Cut the decap pin off, so it sizes but doesn't decap; this will become your convinient "neck only" lubeless solution. Pull all the bullets with the puller and keep the powder. Neck size with the shortened mandrel to get your neck tension back (primers remain untouched). Recharge and reseat all the cases. Go send em. Score a 60 :P

I had old service loads from a deceased estate that had the worst neck tension i had ever seen. Some of them were literally loose and only held in by the canelure crimp. Did the above treatment and they shot an absolute treat.

On the subject of loads, a full to the base case of 08 under the 155gr is the go, in best quality brass that will yield consistent and repeatable neck tension. Nonethless, ideally you need to be annealing.

And a big jump is not necessarily the end of the world, depends what your rifle prefers. It's annecdotal; but i felt like going from the SMK #2155 to the SMK #2156 needed more jump. At least in my Neilson, unlike the #2155, the #2156 doesn't seem to like being super close to the lands. The point is, such a jump may have been deliberate, depending on just how far down the rabbit hole your pop was...

About recoil; I never leave home without my trusty service rifle jacket, purely for the fact that it cuts out any recoil discomfort. Here it is:

https://youtube.com/shorts/W3aTa76bqiE? ... u8KoFKGEeT

Very important for recoilers. Pain = fatigue = flinch/snatch = bad scores. You've got to do something about that.
Last edited by in2anity on 31 Aug 2023, 11:31 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by bladeracer » 31 Aug 2023, 11:14 am

perentie wrote:When one inherits firearms as a beneficiary of a Will, are the firearms just transferred to ones Licence or does one have to get a PTA and pay a brokers fee for each one?


You still need PtA's.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by ClaytonT88 » 31 Aug 2023, 8:46 pm

perentie wrote:When one inherits firearms as a beneficiary of a Will, are the firearms just transferred to ones Licence or does one have to get a PTA and pay a brokers fee for each one?


Yep, as previously stated, PTA's for each, dealer fee for each and then registration fee for each.

Thanks for all the advice in2! Keen as to get this uni semester over with and delve into it with both feet. I'm slowly making a list and order bits and pieces, there's a couple of jackets in all the kit which I may look at getting tailored to fit me, I'm smaller than both my uncle and pop so it should be do-able I imagine.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by perentie » 01 Sep 2023, 7:01 am

thanks for the replies. There is a couple of young brothers in the club that I am teaching shooting BP to. My only heir is not interested in shooting so I am leaving all my guns to the brothers. When my wife died her guns were transferred to me no PTA etc so I thought it might apply in all cases. So may as well start transferring now in that case.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 01 Sep 2023, 11:58 am

@Clayton i would imagine the neilson won't hurt as much as the m77 - my neilson is around 6kg and felt recoil is negliable. Nevertheless I use a heavy TR jacket whenever i shoot it, and they are thick af.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by JohnV » 01 Sep 2023, 2:03 pm

in2anity wrote:I have old handloads like that from late shooters. In my experience, handloads back then were not made to the same standard as they are now. Heck many blokes were on the lee class loader. Furthermore, my understanding is that at some stage, the sizes of the scoring rings were reduced. Not exactly sure what year it was - it could have been before 2001. Long and short of it, loads that may have been competitive back then, may not stand up to today's standards. Particularly, the importance of consistent neck tension was not appreciated. I was reloading 308 full bore loads for the schools comp in approximately 2002, and i distinctly remember thinking how inconsistent seating "felt" load to load. But this was not for me to judge; our coach was the one ordering us what to do. Annealing was certainly not a common thing back then.

I agree the standard overall on average now is better than decades ago . Equipment and dies are better and access to information is way better .
However there was a distinct difference in hand loading skills from say bench rest comp to say full bore because of a different system of rules and requirements . Then there was the fringe dwelling experimenters like me who did things way before others that is now common place . I was using my own home made body dies in about 1968 . I remember back then going to a full bore range once and switching barrels on my towbar barrel vice and a range officer nearly had a fit .
I was concerned with consistent neck tensions back in 1968 and developing the body die was part of my whole neck turning for the factory chamber ideas .
Life is funny you can't be ahead of the curve and you can't be behind the curve you have to be doing what everyone else is or your looked upon as a looser or a weirdo . Competition shooters tend to be a bit like that they copy the ones that are winning wether it's good for them or not . Then a weirdo comes along with something totally different and beats everyone and suddenly he is the flavor of the month and they all start copying his gear . They will deny that but I have seen it . The strange part is that the people who shoot less but experiment more learn better ways quicker than the ones who shoot all the time and just do what others do . They will be better shots because of more time shooting but the experiments have better reloading and tinkering skills .
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 01 Sep 2023, 2:43 pm

JohnV wrote:I agree the standard overall on average now is better than decades ago . Equipment and dies are better and access to information is way better .
However there was a distinct difference in hand loading skills from say bench rest comp to say full bore because of a different system of rules and requirements . Then there was the fringe dwelling experimenters like me who did things way before others that is now common place . I was using my own home made body dies in about 1968 . I remember back then going to a full bore range once and switching barrels on my towbar barrel vice and a range officer nearly had a fit .
I was concerned with consistent neck tensions back in 1968 and developing the body die was part of my whole neck turning for the factory chamber ideas .
Life is funny you can't be ahead of the curve and you can't be behind the curve you have to be doing what everyone else is or your looked upon as a looser or a weirdo . Competition shooters tend to be a bit like that they copy the ones that are winning wether it's good for them or not . Then a weirdo comes along with something totally different and beats everyone and suddenly he is the flavor of the month and they all start copying his gear . They will deny that but I have seen it . The strange part is that the people who shoot less but experiment more learn better ways quicker than the ones who shoot all the time and just do what others do . They will be better shots because of more time shooting but the experiments have better reloading and tinkering skills .


True words JohnV. One thing I like about sling shooting (either TR or SR) is that we can get away with relatively sloppier handloads! I won't call them poor, but put it this way, I am a way off being able to realise the gains from turning those necks. So long as my TR loads mechanically group comfortably south of 1moa, that's all I need right now. And the SMK will do that, perhaps with a bit of ogive sorting. That leaves approx a minute left over for wind+human error. F-open is a whole nother level of precision - your setup needs to be south of 1/2moa if not better. Not for me thanks; i just wanna go shoot! Handloading for me is a chore. Nope i have neither the time, patience nor funds to go full eric cortina-tard on my handloads. Good enough is good enough.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by JohnV » 01 Sep 2023, 4:32 pm

I get what you are saying . You load according to your needs and I agree that some of it is overkill . I am the same as you on a few of my basic hunting rifles but I put in more reloading effort on others . To see the neck turning advantage in a standard factory chamber you have to do the partial neck sizing and body die sizing thing and already have a sub 1 moa grouping rifle to be able to physically see it on the target . You only skim neck tun to clean up about 75% of the neck surface so you not thinning the neck too much . Reloading was never a chore for me because I started when there was no computers , no internet , very few decent books and most of my advice came from Gunsmith Bill Marden Senior an Armorer friend in the Army and magazines like Sporting Shooter , writers like Nick Harvey , Colin Shadbolt etc.
That got me going and the rest I invented myself from testing all sorts of stupid and good ideas . One test I did on cartridge storage lasted 10 years .
Being ex Military and blasting away with machine guns and all kinds of weapons and grenades etc. I got more pleasure out of experimenting with new ideas than blasting away at the range for hours . My hearing was damaged in Vietnam from an exploding mortar shell and it hurts my head to suffer too much muzzle blast and report for too long on confined ranges even with earmuffs . It's way better out in the field even without earmuffs .
I invented some of the stuff that Eric Cortina , David Tubb , German Salazar and others talk about . Why was I not a World champion . Two words , Poor and Vietnam .
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by Larry » 02 Sep 2023, 2:14 pm

in2 and John I agree with you both the beat TR shooter in Aus and probably the world James Corbet is a mad experimenter he also documents all his data and results then analyzes it to see where the improvements are. He is also a super consistent person and a fantastic shot but his real skill is not always winning every range bit being in the top 3 every time which gives him the win for the comp. Every shot is a new shot you cant do anything about the shot that has just been sent so dont get frustrated by any wayward shot.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 02 Sep 2023, 10:12 pm

Larry wrote:in2 and John I agree with you both the beat TR shooter in Aus and probably the world James Corbet is a mad experimenter he also documents all his data and results then analyzes it to see where the improvements are. He is also a super consistent person and a fantastic shot but his real skill is not always winning every range bit being in the top 3 every time which gives him the win for the comp. Every shot is a new shot you cant do anything about the shot that has just been sent so dont get frustrated by any wayward shot.

A well known face. As is the Baileys and Negus’. Now this crew has the ability to realize the gains from intricate load dev. A humble B-grader such as myself - yeah I’m better off putting extra effort into dry fire, over say turning necks.

Btw said team did phenomenally at Bisley, did you see?
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 07 Sep 2023, 10:02 am

JohnV wrote:I invented some of the stuff that Eric Cortina , David Tubb , German Salazar and others talk about . Why was I not a World champion . Two words , Poor and Vietnam .

Quite the claim, my friend. Quite the claim. You must be better than everyone you ever shot with, right?
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by JohnV » 09 Sep 2023, 2:11 pm

in2anity wrote:
JohnV wrote:I invented some of the stuff that Eric Cortina , David Tubb , German Salazar and others talk about . Why was I not a World champion . Two words , Poor and Vietnam .

Quite the claim, my friend. Quite the claim. You must be better than everyone you ever shot with, right?

You never read it properly . I invented things but was not a champion shot . Redding manufactured the body die in secrecy for over 20 years because they stole the idea . You had to ask for one for it to be made . You think that someoen has to be famous to know anything or invent anything . This is my first body die made from an old Lyman FLS die back in 1968 .
I really don't care what you think you know .
It looks good because it was packed in grease and I wire brushed it up for the photo a while back .
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 12 Sep 2023, 9:08 am

JohnV wrote:I really don't care what you think you know .


No matter what you were implying, when you say things like (and I quote) "i I invented some of the stuff that Eric Cortina , David Tubb , German Salazar and others talk about . Why was I not a World champion . Two words , Poor and Vietnam ." sorry mate it's hard not to get noticed :unknown: all due respect, I take it that's what you want? To get noticed?

And maybe you were truly ahead of the reloading curve back in the day, and that's great, well done, good on you. The experimenters (who also win comps, like James Corbett) lead the pack in terms of reloading mantra, no doubt about it. And you are right, the runner-ups always copy the champions. I've literally done it myself.

But from my perspective, as a regular sling shooter competitor, all that hyper detailed benchrest reloading OCD stuff. All the stuff keyboard reloaders talk about with their brand new tactical rifles, is just not as applicable as we give it credence. Heck even for FSTD or FTR, it's more important to simply get out on to the mound every week, and experience poor wind and poor lighting first hand. You learn a lot more from bad shoots, in poor conditions, than you do from good ones. Being able to read the wind correctly, under all circumstance, is what is required to be among the best. Yes your ammo needs to be "good enough" for the job. But it doesn't need to be overkill, and doesn't need to take a hellishly long time to craft. Most importantly the consumables jsut need to be top quality. Find an OK load, then go shoot! Shoot for weeks, if not months on the same load, keep full records, then make decisions about tweaking, over large samples of data.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by ClaytonT88 » 18 Jun 2024, 2:14 pm

Well I've had the Ruger out a couple of times, as I'm still waiting for the Nielsen PTA to come through (not sure what the hold up is, they keep losing the application apparently).

I've been using the inherited ammunition that is labelled "Ruger" which are a mix of 155grn and 190 grn hand loads that were stashed in my Poppas' shed and labelled circa 2003...so they're probably very old and/or he didn't update the labels.

Its' not the most accurate/nicest rifle to shoot, trigger is heavy and it shoots about a 1" group at 50m, best score of a 44.1 at 700 yards, so I'm hanging out to get the Nielsen and get it sorted out for some target work.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by in2anity » 18 Jun 2024, 3:04 pm

ClaytonT88 wrote:Its' not the most accurate/nicest rifle to shoot, trigger is heavy and it shoots about a 1" group at 50m, best score of a 44.1 at 700 yards, so I'm hanging out to get the Nielsen and get it sorted out for some target work.

Full case of 08 under a Sierra #2156 with perhaps 50 thou jump (bigger jump just on that #2156), and the Neilsen could give you 3/4" moa 15 shot groups. Enough to clean it at 1000yds, on a good day.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by SCJ429 » 18 Jun 2024, 7:22 pm

in2anity wrote:
JohnV wrote:I invented some of the stuff that Eric Cortina , David Tubb , German Salazar and others talk about . Why was I not a World champion . Two words , Poor and Vietnam .

Quite the claim, my friend. Quite the claim. You must be better than everyone you ever shot with, right?

Too funny. :drinks:
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by ClaytonT88 » 20 Jun 2024, 3:57 pm

in2anity wrote:
ClaytonT88 wrote:Its' not the most accurate/nicest rifle to shoot, trigger is heavy and it shoots about a 1" group at 50m, best score of a 44.1 at 700 yards, so I'm hanging out to get the Nielsen and get it sorted out for some target work.

Full case of 08 under a Sierra #2156 with perhaps 50 thou jump (bigger jump just on that #2156), and the Neilsen could give you 3/4" moa 15 shot groups. Enough to clean it at 1000yds, on a good day.


Yeah, I've sent another email to firearms to suss out what's happening with the latest PTA
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by ClaytonT88 » 19 Jul 2024, 1:02 pm

3rd attempt at a PTA, they keep knocking it back because I already have a single shot for target use, looking like I'll hand in/sell the Ruger so I can get my hands on the Neilsen.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by Larry » 19 Jul 2024, 1:10 pm

ClaytonT88 wrote:3rd attempt at a PTA, they keep knocking it back because I already have a single shot for target use, looking like I'll hand in/sell the Ruger so I can get my hands on the Neilsen.


That is bizarre FFS its a single shot and any competitor that can afford it would like to have a backup or a spare to see which one is better. Even the Gestapo in WA have made special exemptions for sport target shooters.
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Re: Inherited Target rifles

Post by ClaytonT88 » 19 Jul 2024, 1:12 pm

Yeah, the LGS is a bit confused as it's the first time it's happened after a resubmit and a chat with them about it being for club/target/sporting use only....hopefully it's resolved, I'm not attached to the Ruger so if I have to trade it in, no sweat, also means I don't need a bigger safe....
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