storage for reloading components.

Reloading equipment, methods, load data, powder and projectile information.

Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by bigfellascott » 11 Mar 2019, 9:09 pm

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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by brett1868 » 11 Mar 2019, 9:23 pm

bigfellascott wrote:
brett1868 wrote:I take the approach that if I need to show a license to buy it then it needs to be properly secured at home. Store your powder in its original containers in a cool dry place in a locked wooden box. Store primers separate from powder and also in a cool dry place, preferably timber box but can be metal. The reason for timber is that in the even of ignition the timber will splinter and splinters typically have a lower velocity compare to steel shrapnel from a metal box.


Do you reckon the powder would explode Brett or just burn out quickly - we need myth busters to do an experiment on it to see if it would :D I've got my doubts to be honest.


I got it from the regs that powder needs to be in a timber box, I've seen personally what happens when powder ignites when stored in an old fridge. My cousin spent a month in hospital, shattered 18 out of 20 sheets of fibro the shed was made from and put the chair he was sitting on through the door and it was only a couple of kg. Keeping them separate makes sense as one is impact sensitive and the other not so much. I have a fairly large magazine, with at times >250k primers and 50kg of propellent. They are in a large timber cabinet on shelves with the powder at the bottom and primers at the top but kept separate from each other. Even the uncle who had the local explosives magazine at Maules Creek in the 80's stored the gelignite in timber boxes. Black powder needs to be kept at least 15m from smokeless from memory, might actually be more and this is the reason not many shops sell black powder as they don't have the real estate to keep them physically separate. I keep a few kgs in my office wardrobe appropriately locked up and clearly labelled. I'll see if I can find the regs and paste a link as it's a good read if you need help getting to sleep :)
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by duncan61 » 11 Mar 2019, 9:25 pm

So under 15Kg is exempt.Makes sense
.22 winchester .22hornet .222 .243 7mm rem mag cbc 12g
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by bigfellascott » 11 Mar 2019, 9:45 pm

brett1868 wrote:
bigfellascott wrote:
brett1868 wrote:I take the approach that if I need to show a license to buy it then it needs to be properly secured at home. Store your powder in its original containers in a cool dry place in a locked wooden box. Store primers separate from powder and also in a cool dry place, preferably timber box but can be metal. The reason for timber is that in the even of ignition the timber will splinter and splinters typically have a lower velocity compare to steel shrapnel from a metal box.


Do you reckon the powder would explode Brett or just burn out quickly - we need myth busters to do an experiment on it to see if it would :D I've got my doubts to be honest.


I got it from the regs that powder needs to be in a timber box, I've seen personally what happens when powder ignites when stored in an old fridge. My cousin spent a month in hospital, shattered 18 out of 20 sheets of fibro the shed was made from and put the chair he was sitting on through the door and it was only a couple of kg. Keeping them separate makes sense as one is impact sensitive and the other not so much. I have a fairly large magazine, with at times >250k primers and 50kg of propellent. They are in a large timber cabinet on shelves with the powder at the bottom and primers at the top but kept separate from each other. Even the uncle who had the local explosives magazine at Maules Creek in the 80's stored the gelignite in timber boxes. Black powder needs to be kept at least 15m from smokeless from memory, might actually be more and this is the reason not many shops sell black powder as they don't have the real estate to keep them physically separate. I keep a few kgs in my office wardrobe appropriately locked up and clearly labelled. I'll see if I can find the regs and paste a link as it's a good read if you need help getting to sleep :)


I would imagine your cousin would have had the fridge locked up tight which would have been the reason it did what it did (basically a big cartridge case by doing that) :D if he had some decent holes in it no doubt it would have been a lot safer as pressure couldn't build up. I remember myth busters doing a test of ammo and none of it was dangerous even though it was sitting in a fire all that happened was the projectiles would travel a very short distance with very little velocity and impact on the walls that were placed around it was almost negligent turns out you'd be flat out getting a bruise from it :lol:

They even shot the ammo and none exploded or showed any signs of fire etc\

Black powder well that definitely goes up with a bang but the celulose based smokeless just tends to flame up quickly and it's over so to speak.
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by Bruiser64 » 12 Mar 2019, 12:23 am

1Fatman wrote:If you have more than 10 kg of powder stored in one area under the explosives act they require it to be labelled Explosives so that in case of fire Emergency services are aware its there.

In WA the storage of gunpowder falls under the Mines Department.
It requires you to store ALL powder (regardless of quantity) in a wooden box made from 19mm timber, painted in a light colour so you can see any spilt powder, and with the required stickers on the box. The box is not to be bolted down so that in the case of an emergency it can be removed. It also needs to be lockable.

For a more in-depth answer and the stickers required here is a link to the DMP site.

http://www.dmp.wa.gov.au/Black-powder-p ... 18581.aspx


It can be a metal container, but it needs to be wood lined. The WAPOL publication mentions a “non-ferrous” lockable, portable container. I tried buying the correct stickers from Blackwoods, but they told me they don’t list them as part of their stock. Luckily my local gun store has the correct sticker format as a printable file they printed on adhesive paper.
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by 1Fatman » 12 Mar 2019, 6:24 am

Bruiser64 wrote:I tried buying the correct stickers from Blackwoods, but they told me they don’t list them as part of their stock. Luckily my local gun store has the correct sticker format as a printable file they printed on adhesive paper.


There are a couple of sellers on EBay that sell them as a kit with all the stickers.
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by straightshooter » 12 Mar 2019, 7:37 am

No1_49er wrote:
Baitlayer wrote:Just picked up my Tikka 6.5 CM and will be getting into reloading for it.Am wondering what are the storage requirements for reloading components such as powder,primers, projectiles, cases etc in SA?

God, help us!
You've got as far as posting in this internet forum.
All State and Territory Acts and Regulations are available on the very same internet. Use whatever search engine you prefer, but it is there. Download a copy so that you can examine it at your leisure.
Me. A grumpy old phart - you betcha :D

Baitlayer wrote:Thanks for the unnecessary sarcasm 49er. I was obviously mistaken in my view that this was a forum where those with already acquired knowledge of a subject make it available to those seeking it.This in order that they do not have to spend hours trolling the self same internet. If this is your idea of helpfulness then ,Thanks but No thanks, why even bother to type a response.Not a grumpy old phart. Just a rude and unhelpful one!
ps. have checked SAPOL site for SA specific info and was unable to find anything about it.But thanks for attempt to belittle my efforts. As i said,rude but unhelpful.


I love this little exchange.
It is neat window into today's world.
The original poster, incensed by the commentary implying his personal indolence, lets fly, too dull witted at that moment to grasp the real import of the offending putative sarcasm which is -Think For Yourself.
Sadly a substantial part of the advice freely offered on the internet of a legal nature isn't worth the paper it's written on and other advice is often just mindless repetition of advertising or promotional jibberish.
"There is no expedient to which a man will not resort to avoid the real labor of thinking." Sir Joshua Reynolds
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by bigfellascott » 12 Mar 2019, 8:20 am

straightshooter wrote:
No1_49er wrote:
Baitlayer wrote:Just picked up my Tikka 6.5 CM and will be getting into reloading for it.Am wondering what are the storage requirements for reloading components such as powder,primers, projectiles, cases etc in SA?

God, help us!
You've got as far as posting in this internet forum.
All State and Territory Acts and Regulations are available on the very same internet. Use whatever search engine you prefer, but it is there. Download a copy so that you can examine it at your leisure.
Me. A grumpy old phart - you betcha :D

Baitlayer wrote:Thanks for the unnecessary sarcasm 49er. I was obviously mistaken in my view that this was a forum where those with already acquired knowledge of a subject make it available to those seeking it.This in order that they do not have to spend hours trolling the self same internet. If this is your idea of helpfulness then ,Thanks but No thanks, why even bother to type a response.Not a grumpy old phart. Just a rude and unhelpful one!
ps. have checked SAPOL site for SA specific info and was unable to find anything about it.But thanks for attempt to belittle my efforts. As i said,rude but unhelpful.


I love this little exchange.
It is neat window into today's world.
The original poster, incensed by the commentary implying his personal indolence, lets fly, too dull witted at that moment to grasp the real import of the offending putative sarcasm which is -Think For Yourself.
Sadly a substantial part of the advice freely offered on the internet of a legal nature isn't worth the paper it's written on and other advice is often just mindless repetition of advertising or promotional jibberish.


Pretty much sums it up :D it's a funny ol world this internet thing, brings out the best and worst in people! :drinks:
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by Ziad » 12 Mar 2019, 8:23 am

Straight shooter shot a bullseye.

I am surprised why the OP didn't ask the gunshop when he was picking up the gun.
Blame it on the phone auto correct
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by Stix » 12 Mar 2019, 8:36 am

Baitlayer wrote:Just picked up my Tikka 6.5 CM and will be getting into reloading for it.Am wondering what are the storage requirements for reloading components such as powder,primers, projectiles, cases etc in SA?


G'day Baitlayer.
Ive always taken the attitude that if it goes bang or burns lock it up.

Bretts similar thought process of locking it away if you need your licence is a good one too...
However its still worth the effort to get the facts--
Before the regs chsnged here, i purchased some air rifle slugs interstate, & i learned that they needed to be locked away back home under the then current regs-- :shock:

The SAPOL site is sadly just like most other government sites, in that it is just full of rubbish & not at all intuitive.
Ive searched it several times & just went in circles & ended up where i started...
Infact, i couldnt even find so much as a link to the regs or act when i searched.

I ended up ringing them & they still wouldnt tell me what i needed to know in relation to stroage requirements of ammo & related items, rather they wanted my address to send me a leaflet... :roll:
(I assume you can imagine what they were up to :roll: )
So getting on here as a way of education is a good thing... :thumbsup:

The SSAA site might be helpful... :unknown:

Or ring SAPOL, they seem way more helpful these days... :thumbsup:
:drinks:
The man who knows everything, doesnt really know everything...he's just stopped learning...
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by Baitlayer » 15 Mar 2019, 10:13 am

Thanks for the info fellas.As matter of interest, I did ask my LGS and their reply was much the same as the info posted here. They also stated that they where unsure of the actual legal requirements for home storage as opposed to commercial requirements.As to the comments about indolence and dullwittedness, well,I wont let fly and call them unrelated to the subject.By the way, the Tikka shoots great,capable of much better than the shooter at this point.Also the little Savage M11 22LR shoots like a laser.Great little rifle and both lefties.
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Re: storage for reloading components.

Post by Oldbloke » 15 Mar 2019, 5:55 pm

Ammo is safe untill its in a enclosed metal container.

https://youtu.be/3SlOXowwC4c
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