Best chainsaw for camping

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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Apollo » 03 May 2016, 10:41 pm

Hey BFS,

You need to come around some time and play with some proper hardwood and a decent saw...084 :D

That wood is more than half rotten already. :sarcasm:
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by bigfellascott » 03 May 2016, 11:00 pm

Yeah some of it was indeed average, the 084 sounds the go mate, might be a tad big for the stuff I get to play with these days :D I hate cutting in that dirty s**t, bloody stuffs ya edge in no time but if that's all I can find well then that will have to do, so long as I can keep warm I'm happy. I did have some nice red box to burn but most of that's gone now. :(
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by MalleeFarmer » 06 May 2016, 5:28 am

Something else to consider is a tungsten chain mine is I think 2 years old and still cuts like new no sharpening yet.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by bigfellascott » 06 May 2016, 5:58 am

MalleeFarmer wrote:Something else to consider is a tungsten chain mine is I think 2 years old and still cuts like new no sharpening yet.


Expensive bastards aren't they. They say they are no good if you hit a rock or are cutting in dirty wood etc and need some sort of diamond files or wheels to sharpen, I've heard good and bad about them and to be honest not sure I'd bother, it doesn't take much to sharpen a chain anyway (couple of mins) I use one of the Stihl 2in1 sharpeners which does the cutters and rackers in one hit so makes it very quick to give em a touch up, I also have a stump vice so if need be I can sort it in the field without fuss.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpQ8LEjJdQ4

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/CHAINSAW-BAR ... 0636931738
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Apollo » 06 May 2016, 9:46 am

bigfellascott wrote:Yeah some of it was indeed average, the 084 sounds the go mate, might be a tad big for the stuff I get to play with these days :D I hate cutting in that dirty s**t, bloody stuffs ya edge in no time but if that's all I can find well then that will have to do, so long as I can keep warm I'm happy. I did have some nice red box to burn but most of that's gone now. :(


The 084 doesn't get that much use these days compared to what I used to do cutting White, Yellow and Red Box from 600mm and above felling trees then blocking them up. I used to cut around 3 tonne a day, 7 days a week for months on end until the supply ran out when the owner decided I was going too slow and brought a dozer in to push the rest, stack it and burnt the lot. Probably the best use the 084 got was ripping box fence posts.

The most used saw here over the past 30 odd years was a 75cc Partner with an 18" Bar. It's very sad compression wise these days so I resort to something smaller. I have a Stihl 023 and a Stihl 023c which are probably the handiest thing with plrenty of guts, 40cc with 12" and 14" bars respectively. Also used to run an Atom Borer when fencing. The short bars with micro chains make each saw feel like it's twice the capacity and light so save on the old back pain.

For a general camping saw I'd go with these. A mate bought a couple of new Stihls, one is about 80cc but his favourite is the 40cc MS230 (same as those two above) and it goes with him everywhere. His came with a 16" bar but it wasn't long before he put the 14" on it and it's stayed.

Talk about dirty wood. Try cutting old railway sleepers with a chainsaw. About 3-4 cuts and it's blunt, very blunt. That's where I've heard tungsten chains being used but not often as they do loose their edge cutting all that metal dust and dirt impregnated into the wood over the years. Hit something solid like a hidden nail, piece of wire I believe it will strip teeth of the tungsten chain and then that's big money for a repair. Thought of one many years ago but the minus points outweighed the positives.

Best carry extra chains if you are in really dirty wood and sharpen them all later.

The stump vice is great and quick when you just want to touch up a chain when refueling. Just a round file and a couple of swipes if you know how to sharpen a chain properly. The first thing they teach you if you do a chainsaw certificate course.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by bigfellascott » 06 May 2016, 10:00 am

Ya running some ol classics there Lindsay :D I reckon they are better in some ways than the new stuff (should outlast em) as they made em to last in those days, sadly the same can't be said about stuff today.

I too like the littler saws for basic firewood cutting duties, they seem up to the job no worries at all and for camping are perfect. My chainsaw mechanic loves his ol saws too and I've seen some of his 2 man saw collections and they are awesome to say the least, the chains on some of them! FMD big arsed bastards for sure but I guess they had to be to cut the big trees that were around back then.

I think the biggest problem people have when it comes to sharpening chains is the rackers, they forget to adjust them down and wonder why the saw won't cut properly, the other problem with some of em is they put the chains on arse about :lol: my mechanics ol man got given a new saw once that had that exact problem!! :lol: he dropped it off to his son to see what the problem was and he immediately spotted what the problem was, turned the chain around and away it went smashing through wood like nobodies business! :D

I don't cut huge amounts of wood in one go (the body isn't up to that sort of thing anymore) I do carry spare chains with me but never really have to worry about using them as I sharpen before heading out each time and if I really need to do it I have the 2in1 and vice in my chainsaw kit anyway so I'm good to go either way.

Only thing I really need to get for the kit is some wedges (occasionally get a bar stuck) but always have a back up saw with me anyway so no big deal there I guess.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Apollo » 06 May 2016, 10:24 am

If you are felling trees then wedges are a must as is a spare blade and chain. Most times two saws but there are also the extras in the tool box.

Just be careful with rackers. They really do not need adjusting all that often. I'd rather use a gauge and check rackers before heading out for a day. Take rackers down too much and you can create a dangerous situation where all the chain wants to do is grab and/or kick.

I used to really enjoy cutting firewood, felling trees etc until I did my back in. Now it's not real fun any more. However the best fun and enjoyment I had many years ago was doing the week long forestry certification courses. First softwood then hardwood training for a workcover certificate I needed for employment. It really opens your eyes watching those trying to learn that have no clue what so ever of how to operate a chainsaw safely yet alone fell just a small tree then trim it of branches without killing themselves. So many things can go wrong.

Anyway, talking about firewood. I've got to go cut some before I run out and looking forward to a mate turning up next week when we'll spend a few days cutting for this winter. I'll get him to do all the bending over and heavy work.

Stay warm.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by bigfellascott » 06 May 2016, 10:39 am

The reason I like the 2in1 is it will only take the rackers down to the correct depth so no chance of taking too much off (this setup does everything in one go so to speak) so sharpening is so quick and easy it's not funny and you know the chain is set up to be at it's optimum each time you sharpen it. Not cheap though at around $80 but well worth it and files are around $9 for a set of 2 so not overly expensive and readily available from any Stihl shop.

Yeah cutting wood can be hard on your body alright, that's why I only do a ute load each time, that's as much as this poor worn out ol body can handle these days LOL. And you are right about people being clueless, but we all started out much the same and we've learn't how to do things the correct way without getting injured so all good.

I'm going to give those nylon wedges a go I reckon, I've tried the metal ones and they just didn't want to bite into the tree like I though they should have (you'd belt em and they'd just want to pop straight back out for some reason) we tried a few diff shapes/sizes and all did the same thing so figured I might go the nylon and see how they react, not that I cut many trees down more the buggers on the ground that want to pinch ya bar that cause me grief at times (mind you I can spot when it's going to happen more often than not now) but would be nice to just belt a wedge in and not have to worry about it so much.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Apollo » 06 May 2016, 10:55 am

I carry two nylon, two aluminium and two steel wedges in my kit as well as a block buster. The steel one's haven't been used since I got the others many years ago. The nylon has teeth on the sides, the aluminium doesn't but hasn't slipped as yet. I do keep driving them in as I cut and they are used to break the hinge when felling a tree. The biggest mistake I have seen others do is keep cutting until the tree starts to fall.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by brett1868 » 06 May 2016, 11:35 am

Not quite a chainsaw but when having to remove >1000 trees it's more efficient :)
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Apollo » 06 May 2016, 1:30 pm

Oh, a baby crawler. You'd want something a lot bigger than that around here to make a scratch on a 30-50 metre tall box tree. :D

Soil Conservation built some dams for me a number of years back and had to remove a couple large yellow box trees, probably around the 40m high x 1.5m at the base with their Cat D6 and boy did that little toy have fun. Much ripping of the ground to try and break roots, then push a monster pile of dirt to build a ramp to give a bit of height advantage. Some hours later and much pushing the first one came over, very hasty retreat by the dozer before the root system came up and tipped the dozer over. Not the sort of thing I'd like to be doing much of, very risky business.

Then out came the Stihl 084 to cut it into a few sections so the dozer could actually push it away bit by bit. Lots a fence posts and later firewood after it dried for some years.

A different story in scrub size timber.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Bourt » 06 May 2016, 2:19 pm

WayneO wrote:I have to admit to never, ever having used a chainsaw in my life. Looking at some of these posts I am not to sure I ever want to either.


Depends on the saw and the job mate.

Saws with a lot of ponies are not for the ones to start with, a kick back can really send the saw flying and if you're not handling the saw in a way to manage it or aren't prepared, look out.

The kind of saws for home / recreational stuff with smaller motors can 'kick', but I'd describe it more as a sharp push than a hard kick back. A lot easier to arrest and steer the saw as it comes, usually not more than half a foot compared to a powerful saw which will throw your arms up in the arm for you.

Can be used very safely :thumbsup:

Seek proper instruction, but easy rules of thumb to follow which put safety first are:

1) Get a saw with a brake (probably can't get them without one these days anyway?)

2) When using the saw lock your front arm straight and pivot with the rear arm so if you get a high kick the brake will hit your firm arm and activate it. (Bent, relaxed front arm means less likely to hit the brake)

3) Only cut logs thinner than the bar is long so you never have to use the top corner of the chain. (Google 'chainsaw kick back zone for this)'.

Can all be done safely with a little care :thumbsup:
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by halfcocked » 07 May 2016, 3:21 pm

on_one_wheel wrote:Agreed on the Husqvarna saws, they are the most reliable saws I have ever owned and they always start easily, the stihl stuff has gone cheep and nasty and are pricks to start and never stay in tune.

If you want to go cheep n nasty, go propper cheep. I bought a arborist saw just like the one in the link below, its great for camping because its very compact and actually runs quite well.

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.vi ... 31&alt=web


i second this ebay link. i have owned the big banger in this brand for years. i use it occasionally and it goes great! once warm you can start it with your little finger. I've done lots of work with it and it gets the job done for about an 8th the cost of a big brand one.
cons: it leaks bar oil. safety cut off lever spring broke, need to hold back entire time while cutting or it engages and cuts out. not safe but meh.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by Lorgar » 16 May 2016, 2:54 pm

bigfellascott wrote:Ah that makes more sense now, more than likely the issue I would say. ;)


So, seems like it was me not giving the new saw enough credit.

Put it to use on the weekend, skipped the choke on all restarts after the initial one and she fired up each time no problem.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by bigfellascott » 16 May 2016, 3:31 pm

Lorgar wrote:
bigfellascott wrote:Ah that makes more sense now, more than likely the issue I would say. ;)


So, seems like it was me not giving the new saw enough credit.

Put it to use on the weekend, skipped the choke on all restarts after the initial one and she fired up each time no problem.


Yeah you only really need the choke if it's cold other than that they normally fire up after one or two pulls if they have been using in say 30mins of restarting again. I think you'll find it a great little saw for camping purposes, they seem very reliable and just work year after year without any real maintenance (12 or 13yrs now and haven't spent a sent on mine maintenance wise (well other than a spark plug).

Empty the fuel tank at the end of the season and use only 91ron or there abouts (no ethanol crap) and no premium stuff either as it makes engines run hotter than the 91ron stuff apparently (according to my small engine mechanic) :thumbsup:
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by darwindingo » 16 May 2016, 4:07 pm

Bourt wrote:
WayneO wrote:I have to admit to never, ever having used a chainsaw in my life. Looking at some of these posts I am not to sure I ever want to either.


Depends on the saw and the job mate.

Saws with a lot of ponies are not for the ones to start with, a kick back can really send the saw flying and if you're not handling the saw in a way to manage it or aren't prepared, look out.

The kind of saws for home / recreational stuff with smaller motors can 'kick', but I'd describe it more as a sharp push than a hard kick back. A lot easier to arrest and steer the saw as it comes, usually not more than half a foot compared to a powerful saw which will throw your arms up in the arm for you.

Can be used very safely :thumbsup:

Seek proper instruction, but easy rules of thumb to follow which put safety first are:

1) Get a saw with a brake (probably can't get them without one these days anyway?)

2) When using the saw lock your front arm straight and pivot with the rear arm so if you get a high kick the brake will hit your firm arm and activate it. (Bent, relaxed front arm means less likely to hit the brake)

3) Only cut logs thinner than the bar is long so you never have to use the top corner of the chain. (Google 'chainsaw kick back zone for this)'.

Can all be done safely with a little care :thumbsup:



Sound Advice..!

Don't let risk put you off using a Chainsaw, Appropriate Training and a Healthy Respect for the "tool" in question have significant impact regarding potential risk. I've encountered quite a few training providers that offer courses for chainsaws, local emergency services groups may offer the service or be willing too..

I like the Stihl but Huskys a great saws too, either will provide a lot of trouble free use IMO.. When it comes to saws I'd buy the best you can afford that will be suitable for your level of use.. If that value = occasional use then a few hundred gold coins at one of the big box shops, may provide a suitable and affordable saw to get you off the axe...

I should say I'm not up to speed on the latest Husky safety tech, however It does appear that Stihl have on offer some good features with regards to safety, like the Quickstop and the Quikstop Plus (Q) I think the additional safety features may be worth a look especially for anyone with limited experience. They also provide a pretty good DVD that covers safe handling with their saws. Another thing to consider is the serviceability of the saw, If you look close and compare the differences between "Home Owner targeted" and a "Pro Series" saw you may notice that the Pro saws have a vertically split casing, this is a good thing when the time comes to overhaul the saw.. I got double warranty for buying a Pro Series for non commercial use :thumbsup: Doubt I'll need it though :unknown: :allegedly:

http://www.stihlusa.com/products/techno ... g-systems/

Although proper instruction will never be replaced by safety mechanisms of any kind, they both go a long way to prevent U from cutting off limbs that are your own... There are other additional protective measures one can take advantage of, such as chaps for example designed to clog the saw chain and help keep the level of injury in check.

Cheers

Jeff
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An "Unintended Discharge" is nothing more than the lack of appropriate safety procedures or the failure to follow them..!

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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by agentzero » 23 May 2016, 11:46 am

darwindingo wrote:Don't let risk put you off using a Chainsaw, Appropriate Training and a Healthy Respect for the "tool" in question have significant impact regarding potential risk.


Same as shooting, if you go into it like a cowboy s**t can happen. Be safe and you'll stay safe.

Approach it the same way, Wayne. No drama.
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Re: Best chainsaw for camping

Post by agentzero » 23 May 2016, 11:48 am

darwindingo wrote:There are other additional protective measures one can take advantage of, such as chaps for example designed to clog the saw chain and help keep the level of injury in check.


The chainsaw chaps are actually pretty amazing IMO.

The first time I saw them and didn't understand what they actually did I was like WTF? Pants? That isn't going to stop anything! :lol:
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