do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Varminting and vertebrate pest control. Small game, hunting feral goats, foxes, dogs, cats, rabbits etc.

do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by CrackThump » 17 May 2019, 1:39 pm

having sucessfully conquered processing rabbits from paddock to pot, its time to have a go at wallaby .

so, for you maraupial hunters out there, when you shoot roo for the table.. do you hang the meat, fridge it, vaccuum pack it or otherwise age it or just cook it.?

cheers in advance for your opinions
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by Stix » 17 May 2019, 3:31 pm

Hey Crackthump...
Ive recently had a hare & roo that i kind of aged.
The Hare was done in very cold fridge (just above freezing) for 2 weeks in cotton then soaked for 3 days in fridge & was amazing..and .i mean absolutely amazing--although next time i think ill do a week in cotton & week in plastic/or covered as some parts were just a tad too dry, but it did rehydrate none the less...

The roo was for a full week (or maybe 8 days)--about 3 or 4 days in cotton & the rest in a freezer bag & was equally amazing as the hare--ive had some pretty good bought roo, but this made the best ive had equal to calfs feet-- it was only rump-not follet & was one of the most tender cuts of red meat ive ever eaten in my life.

Both hare & roo were amazing even though only aged for that short time.

Im keen to know what you do & how you go...!!
:drinks:
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by on_one_wheel » 17 May 2019, 3:41 pm

The best too I've had was still twitching, and cooked rare.
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by CrackThump » 18 Jun 2019, 6:11 pm

Stix wrote:Hey Crackthump...
Ive recently had a hare & roo that i kind of aged.
The Hare was done in very cold fridge (just above freezing) for 2 weeks in cotton then soaked for 3 days in fridge & was amazing..and .i mean absolutely amazing--although next time i think ill do a week in cotton & week in plastic/or covered as some parts were just a tad too dry, but it did rehydrate none the less...

The roo was for a full week (or maybe 8 days)--about 3 or 4 days in cotton & the rest in a freezer bag & was equally amazing as the hare--ive had some pretty good bought roo, but this made the best ive had equal to calfs feet-- it was only rump-not follet & was one of the most tender cuts of red meat ive ever eaten in my life.

Both hare & roo were amazing even though only aged for that short time.

Im keen to know what you do & how you go...!!
:drinks:



Hey Stix..

thanks for that advice, Ive just cooked up the best (first) wallaby stew ever..

after seperating the cuts, I let them age in a ziplock bag in the bottom of the fridge for a week and then straight in the pot..

now.. I know that the slowcooker helped.. and it WAS the backstraps .. but OMG it is as tender as F%$#.

cheers for all the help guys.

bring on the next hunting trip.
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by wrenchman » 19 Jun 2019, 5:21 am

not to hijack the post but them wallabys look rather lean is there a comon way to cook them.
if you do ground do you add any fat.
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by Cooper » 19 Jun 2019, 9:18 am

I've heard about soaking Roo in milk overnight and it will pull the game taste out abit. Will have to give it a try.
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by marksman » 19 Jun 2019, 6:29 pm

if you soak the blood out with salted water you will get rid of the game taste, no different than rabbit
the idea with milk is to use butter milk or yogurt because it will tenderise your meat, apparently

my family has been eating pressure cooked roo lately cooked as you would beef, we cannot taste the difference as in you would know it was young roo
funny I have just given the better half's recipe to Stix :lol:
I also mentioned about us big hunter men types swapping recipes :lol:
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by Stix » 19 Jun 2019, 6:30 pm

wrenchman wrote:not to hijack the post but them wallabys look rather lean is there a comon way to cook them.
if you do ground do you add any fat.


Im not sure about Wallaby...but ill let you know how roo goes when i mince some up...

You can buy roo mice packaged by the company that has the monopoly on roo meat here in aus but it is so bloody watery...

When i have time ill experiment with & without fat...but yes all this type of meat is lean & generally strong in flavour.

Have you tried roo meat Wrenchman---can you get it over there...?
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by marksman » 19 Jun 2019, 6:33 pm

wrenchman wrote:not to hijack the post but them wallabys look rather lean is there a comon way to cook them.
if you do ground do you add any fat.


roo/wallaby is very lean but I haven't found the need for adding fat
I eat it as steaks or stew type prep, when cooking as a steak the rule is no more than medium as with all game meat or you will have tasty boot leather
:drinks:
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by Stix » 19 Jun 2019, 6:36 pm

marksman wrote:if you soak the blood out with salted water you will get rid of the game taste, no different than rabbit
the idea with milk is to use butter milk or yogurt because it will tenderise your meat, apparently

my family has been eating pressure cooked roo lately cooked as you would beef, we cannot taste the difference as in you would know it was young roo
funny I have just given the better half's recipe to Stix :lol:
I also mentioned about us big hunter men types swapping recipes :lol:


:lol:
Cant wait to try it...!!!
Im putting a buck bunny in the slow cooker tomorrow,,,once thats out im giving that recipe a crack...(thanks Mrs Marksman... :D )
:thumbsup:
:drinks:
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by marksman » 19 Jun 2019, 6:36 pm

Stix wrote:
wrenchman wrote:not to hijack the post but them wallabys look rather lean is there a comon way to cook them.
if you do ground do you add any fat.


Im not sure about Wallaby...but ill let you know how roo goes when i mince some up...

You can buy roo mice packaged by the company that has the monopoly on roo meat here in aus but it is so bloody watery...

When i have time ill experiment with & without fat...but yes all this type of meat is lean & generally strong in flavour.

Have you tried roo meat Wrenchman---can you get it over there...?


I would add pork fat or even lard with mince Stix but be careful as my aldi mincer did not like mincing fat
I found it better to add the fat as you were mincing the second time in small chunks :thumbsup:
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Re: do you age your wallaby/roo.?

Post by wrenchman » 19 Jun 2019, 11:49 pm

we can not get roo here and have never had it i would think it would be like deer meat is ther any parasites you have to watch for when cleaning and cooking there are a few with deer but it is real easy to see.
bear and pigs are treated the same here cooked very well they carry trichinella
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