Phrases coined from firearm related things

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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by Noisydad » 07 Jan 2017, 4:14 pm

Another...to "Clear the decks" Was an order for sailors to literally clear the decks of their hammocks, chairs, tables and every thing else that had to share space below on the gun decks to make way for loading, firing and recoiling guns.
There's still a few of Wile. E Coyote's ideas that I haven't tried yet.
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by GLS_1956 » 08 Jan 2017, 12:56 am

A few other phrases I've heard used are "Short Round" a term used to indicate an artillery round that short of target. I've also heard it used in referring to a pass in American Football where the Quarterback underthrew the receiver.

"Friendly fire" being shot by your own troops. Or in politics when one member of the same party says something against a fellow party member.
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by Noisydad » 13 Jan 2017, 11:54 am

Just found the origin of the word "stock" as we use it...The term stock in reference to firearms dates to 1571 is derived from the Germanic word stoc, meaning tree trunk, referring to the wooden nature of the gunstock.[3]
Never knew that and it's been bugging me. Now I can sleep at night again. :)
There's still a few of Wile. E Coyote's ideas that I haven't tried yet.
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by bigfellascott » 31 Jan 2017, 2:57 pm

The rifle shoots better than I can - WTF does that supposed to mean really? Hello it's the nut behind the butt doin the shootin FFS not the rifle shooting on its own. :lol:
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by on_one_wheel » 15 Jun 2019, 1:14 pm

Here's another thats on topic ... just

"to shoot someone with a pellet of their own $hit"

"Peter is such an a$$hole, it's about time he got shot with a pellet of his own $hit"

Same as giving somebody a taste of their own medicine.
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by pomemax » 15 Jun 2019, 3:23 pm

yer under their guns
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by marksman » 15 Jun 2019, 6:32 pm

blaze away
all guns blazing
cheap shot
dodged a bullet
to gun it
go great guns
have a shot at
shot through like a bondi tram
hot shot
if I tell you I will have to shoot you
jump the gun
in the line of fire
long shot
loose cannon
not by a long shot
odd angry shot
rifle through
shot down in flames
shoot the breeze
shoot your mouth off
shoot yourself in the foot
son of a gun
to many irons in the fire
got you covered


I had help from the googling females in the house :drinks:
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by mickb » 16 Jun 2019, 12:09 am

A 'gun' worker, aka fast at manual labour.
A person of sufficient calibre.
The object cannoned into him.
That boxers legs are shot
Sniping comments
Bombard with questions
machine gun with questions
A shot-put
Going off half cocked
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by Bazooker » 17 Jun 2019, 3:51 pm

From the world of shotgunning:-

"Off its face" an old gun that is so worn that it no longer locks up tight.

"Knocked up" an old gun that has had its action tightened by hammering (upsetting) the metal in the action in such a manner to take up clearance and restore the lock up to tight.......something that is well and truly rooted?

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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by TassieTiger » 17 Jun 2019, 4:20 pm

“Keep going, and I’ll shoot you in the face” - old timers in tassie and meant that if you keep...ummm...errr. Never mind.
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by gunnnie » 02 Jul 2019, 9:10 pm

on_one_wheel wrote:
Noisydad wrote:Another... The whole 9 yards- as in give 'em the lot! It originates from .50 BMG belts of shells being 9 yards long.

I would never have guessed that one :drinks:


Hate to pour water on the fire but the jury is out on the origin of "the whole 9yds". It doesn't come from WW2 machinegun belts. The earliest known instsnce of the saying was 'the whole 6yds' in 1910. Certainly long before 1939-45.
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by mickb » 02 Jul 2019, 10:32 pm

Thats correct gunnie, lots of debate on the 9 yards saying
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by Wombat » 03 Jul 2019, 8:05 am

marksman wrote:blaze away


to many irons in the fire


I thought too many irons was derived from blacksmiths. They can only work so many pieces at once, ignore one for too long and it'll get too hot in the forge. :unknown:
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Re: Phrases coined from firearm related things

Post by Eoin » 04 Aug 2019, 7:40 pm

Flash in the pan also refers to a speck or two of gold shewing in an alluvial miner's dish.
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